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Fig. 7 | Microbiome

Fig. 7

From: Uncovering the genomic potential of the Amazon River microbiome to degrade rainforest organic matter

Fig. 7

Priming effect model of microbial TeOM degradation in the Amazon River. The cellulolytic communities degrade hemi-/cellulose through secretion of glycosyl hydrolases (mainly GH3/GH10), which release sugars to the environment. These sugars can promote growth of the cellulolytic and lignolytic communities, and during this process, the oxidative metabolism produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS activate the exoenzymes (mainly DYPs and laccases) secreted by the lignolytic community to oxidize lignin. After lignin oxidation, the hemi-/cellulose becomes exposed again, helping the cellulolytic communities to degrade it. During the previous process, several aromatic compounds are formed, which can potentially inhibit cellulolytic enzymes and microbial growth. However, these compounds are consumed by lignolytic microorganisms, reducing their concentration in the environment allowing decomposition to proceed

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